Previous Events Pg. 7

Orange County Jewish Community Scholar Program
Due to the Pandemic, Orange County Jewish Community Scholar Program has switched to using ZOOM to facilitate Online Events & Podcasts. Below is a list of our recent Online Events we have created and uploaded to YouTube™. To view a desired event video, simply click one of the links below.
 
  Special Note: Listings below without a link to a video on youtube could not be uploaded due to copyright and permission issues.
 
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  • Topic: CSP “Maestro” Event – DEFIANT REQUIEM
    Speaker: Murry Sidlin, live from Baltimore, MD

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    Defiant Requiem tells the story of Rafael Schachter, a brilliant young and passionate Czech opera-choral conductor who was sent to the concentration camp of Theresienstadt (Terezin) in 1941. Determined to sustain dignity, humanity, and hope within his fellow prisoners, he taught 150 prisoners Verdi’s Requiem using a smuggled score. They performed on 16 occasions with the last, most infamous performance on June 23, 1944, in front of high-ranking SS officers and the International Red Cross to support the charade that the prisoners were well treated and flourishing. For over ten years, conductor Murry Sidlin has dreamed of bringing the Requiem back to Terezin. Now, through soaring concert footage, powerful survivor recollections, cinematic dramatizations and evocative animation, Defiant Requiem brings the incredible story of this artistic uprising to life. Join us on Friday August 28th at 12:30 PM for a 45-minute screening of the film, to include an introduction and post-film Q&A with Maestro Murry Sidlin, President and Creative Director of The Defiant Requiem Foundation.

    Murry Sidlin, a conductor with a unique gift for engaging audiences, continues a diverse and distinctive musical career. He is the president and creative director of The Defiant Requiem Foundation, an organization that sponsors live concert performances of Defiant Requiem: Verdi at Terezín and Hours of Freedom: The Story of the Terezín Composer; as well as other projects including the documentary film, Defiant Requiem; a new docudrama called Mass Appeal, 1943, which was premiered in June 2017; and The Rafael Schächter Institute for Arts and Humanities at Terezín. In addition, he lectures extensively on the arts and humanities as practiced by the prisoners in the Theresienstadt (Terezín) Concentration Camp.

    Mr. Sidlin began his career as assistant conductor of the Baltimore Symphony under Sergiu Comissiona and then was appointed resident conductor of the National Symphony Orchestra by Antal Doráti. He has served as music director of the New Haven and Long Beach (California) Symphonies, the Tulsa Philharmonic, and the Connecticut Ballet. For eight years he was resident conductor of the Oregon Symphony and, from 2002 to 2010, he served as Dean of the School of Music at The Catholic University of America in Washington, DC. Murry Sidlin was principal guest conductor of the Gävleborgs Symfoniorkester in Sweden and was artistic director of the Cascade Festival of Music in Bend, Oregon for twelve summers. He has conducted more than 300 concerts with the San Diego Symphony, and, on December 31, 2011, conducted his 18th consecutive New Year’s Eve Gala at the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts in Washington, DC with the National Symphony Orchestra. The summer of 2011 marked Mr. Sidlin’s 33rd year as resident artist/teacher and associate director of conducting studies at the Aspen Music Festival where, with conductor David Zinman, he developed the American Academy of Conducting.

    In April of 2002 Murry Sidlin presented the first performances of Defiant Requiem: Verdi at Terezín in Portland, Oregon. Since the premiere, he has led nearly fifty performances. On three occasions – in May 2006, May 2009, and June 2009 – Mr. Sidlin has led performances in the Czech town of Terezín, the site of the Theresienstadt Concentration Camp. The June 2009 performance served as the conclusion to the multi-national Holocaust Era Assets conference attended by nearly 600 delegates from 47 nations and hosted by the Czech government and the Forum 2000 Foundation. On May 9, 2010, Defiant Requiem was presented to an audience of 5,000 people in Budapest, Hungary and broadcast live on Duna Television throughout Eastern Europe. Defiant Requiem was performed in Jerusalem on May 31, 2012, with the Jerusalem Symphony Orchestra and Kühn Choir of Prague, by the Atlanta Symphony Orchestra and Chorus on October 11, 2012, and at the Konzerthaus Berlin on March 4, 2014. Performances have also been given at Avery Fisher Hall in New York City, Symphony Center in Chicago, and Boston Symphony Hall, among many others. On December 3, 2017, a new version of Defiant Requiem – for chorus, soloists, single piano, and violin – was premiered at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte.

    Murry Sidlin studied with the legendary pedagogues Leon Barzin and Sergiu Celibidache. He was appointed by Presidents Ford and Carter to serve on the White House Commission of Presidential Scholars. He won national acclaim for the television series Music Is…, a ten-part series about music for children that was seen on PBS for five years. In 1997, the National Association of Independent Schools of Music recognized Mr. Sidlin as Educator of the Year. He has been featured on NBC’s Today Show, ABC’s Good Morning America, and CBS Sunday Morning. Most recently he was asked to appear on CNN International to speak about Defiant Requiem. In May of 2011 Mr. Sidlin received the Distinguished Alumnus Award from his alma mater the Peabody Conservatory of Johns Hopkins University. The award honors alumni who have typified the Johns Hopkins tradition of excellence and brought credit to the University by their personal accomplishments, professional achievement, and humanitarian service. In September of 2011, the Archbishop of Prague presented him with the medal of St. Agnes of Bohemia for his dedication to illuminating the legacy of Terezín. In January 2013, Mr. Sidlin was nominated to the International Board of Governors of the Jerusalem Academy of Music and Dance. Murry Sidlin received the Simon Wiesenthal Center’s Medal of Valor on June 11, 2013, for his extraordinary efforts to keep alive the memory of Rafael Schächter.

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  • Topic: Symphony No 1: JUDAICA (Days of Awe)
    Speaker: Steve Rothstein

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    Each of the four movements of this first ever High Holiday symphony contains original musical material based on the traditional Jewish New Year services of 18th, 19th, and 20th century Eastern European synagogues. This work is the first commissioned work by Prof. Robert H. Freilich, Founder and President of the Judaic Sacred Music Foundation, who attended High Holiday services in Boro Park led by the brilliant Cantor Moshe Moshe Koussevitzky. Professor Freilich has been fascinated with the High Holiday liturgy and music since his youth in New York City. As a teen, his father Julius Freilich sang in the choir of world-famous Cantor Yossele Rosenblatt on the lower East Side from 1912-1924 and later graduated from the Jewish Theological Seminary in 1925. If this program doesn’t get you ready for the High Holidays, nothing will!

    Steven Rothstein is active as a composer and music instructor in the Los Angeles area. He received his Ph.D. in Music Composition from the University of California, Los Angeles (2006). Mr. Rothstein has written numerous works for orchestra, chamber ensembles, wind ensemble, choral groups, as well as art songs. Interest in Judaic music led Dr. Rothstein to study at the Brandeis-Bardin Collegiate Institute (1996), and then onto a one-year study program at the World Union of Jewish Students (WUJS) program in Arad, Israel (2000-1). Dedicated to promoting Jewish culture through music, Mr. Rothstein has devoted the majority of his choral music to Hebrew texts. His work includes settings for Psalm 27, Psalm 121, numerous Hanukkah pieces, and art songs based on a variety of Hebrew poetry.

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  • Topic: CSP Annual Pre-High Holiday Program – Symphony No 1: JUDAICA (Days of Awe)
    Speaker: Steven Rothstein, live from Los Angeles, CA
    Dedicated in honor of CSP Patron and Board Member Marion Brockett

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    Join us as we prepare for the High Holidays with composer Steven Rothstein who will discuss his commissioned work – Symphony No.1: JUDAICA (Days of Awe). Each of the four movements of this first ever High Holiday symphony contains original musical material based on the traditional Jewish New Year services of 18th, 19th, and 20th century Eastern European synagogues. This work is the first commissioned work by Prof. Robert H. Freilich, Founder and President of the Judaic Sacred Music Foundation, who attended High Holiday services in Boro Park led by the brilliant Cantor Moshe Moshe Koussevitzky. Professor Freilich has been fascinated with the High Holiday liturgy and music since his youth in New York City. As a teen, his father Julius Freilich sang in the choir of world-famous Cantor Yossele Rosenblatt on the lower East Side from 1912-1924 and later graduated from the Jewish Theological Seminary in 1925. If this program doesn’t get you ready for the High Holidays, nothing will!

    About the Symphony: Movement 1: Adante Espressivo, centers on the theme of the “call to worship” in both Rosh Hashana and Yom Kippur services, with references to the Chatzi Kaddish, Sha-arey Shamayim, Barchu, Zochreinu and B’Rosh Hashanah Yikatevun. Movement II: Moderato Con Anima centers on the them of “Praise”, with references to Kia Anu Amecha, Mechalkel Chayim, Mi She-anah, Vayomer Adonai, Melech Al Kol Ha-aretz, Adon Olam and Yigdal. Movement III: Adagio Non Troppo contains an A theme taken from the Kol Nidre prayer and a B theme that is taken from the Grand Aleinu. Movement IV: Allegro Con Spirito is an, exciting, and spirited final movement that juxtaposes three different melodic settings of the central prayer Avinu Malkeinu – one hassidic, one traditional, and one reform. The Kaddish and various shofar fanfares are also incorporated.

    Steven Rothstein is active as a composer and music instructor in the Los Angeles area. He received his Ph.D. in Music Composition from the University of California, Los Angeles (2006). Mr. Rothstein has written numerous works for orchestra, chamber ensembles, wind ensemble, choral groups, as well as art songs. His works have been performed by The American Youth Symphony, the UCLA Philharmonic, the UC Irvine Symphony, the Redlands Symphony, and the New York Master Chorale. In 2008 his oratorio Hymn of Light received its international premiere in China. Interest in Judaic music led Dr. Rothstein to study at the Brandeis-Bardin Collegiate Institute (1996), and then onto a one-year study program at the World Union of Jewish Students (WUJS) program in Arad, Israel (2000-1). Dedicated to promoting Jewish culture through music, Mr. Rothstein has devoted the majority of his choral music to Hebrew texts. His work includes settings for Psalm 27, Psalm 121, numerous Hanukkah pieces, and art songs based on a variety of Hebrew poetry. As a professor, Dr. Rothstein has lectured on a broad range of music topics including music fundamentals, diatonic harmony, chromatic harmony, 20th-century techniques, composition, orchestration, modal and tonal counterpoint, form and analysis, orchestral score study, style composition, ear-training, and film score analysis. He has taught at Los Angeles Valley College, Santa Monica College, Bob Cole Conservatory of Music at California State University, Long Beach, and California State University, Dominguez Hills. Mr. Rothstein has also lectured for the Los Angeles Philharmonic’s Adult Outreach Program. He currently teaches at UCLA Extension’s prestigious Film Scoring Certificate Program where he recently won the 2013 Distinguished Instructor Award. In preparation for his commission from the Judaic Sacred Music Foundation (Symphony No.1: JUDAICA (Days of Awe), Dr. Rothstein spent considerable time researching the various liturgical melodies and motives used throughout the High Holy Day services and has incorporated them extensively throughout the entire work in order to create a rich tapestry of musical expression based solely on this unique musical liturgy

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  • Topic: Jewish Readings of Modern Movies and TV Part 4 of 4: Stranger Things – The Upside-down and the Sitra Achra
    Speaker: Rafi Zarum

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    Stranger Things – The Upside-down and the Sitra AchraWith copious references to 80s music, cinema and culture, Netflix’s ‘Stranger Things’ is a horror-genred nostalgia-fest that speaks to adults and teens alike. But its religious undertones are under-appreciated. Shadowy fiends, demonic possession and the Other Side (Sitra Achra) feature in the Talmud, Zohar and kabbalistic works. That’s a code red….

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  • Topic: The Dead Sea Scrolls: New Perspectives on the Bible, Judaism and Christianity Part 2 of 3: The Dead Sea Scrolls and the New Testament
    Speaker: LH Schiffman

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    The Dead Sea Scrolls and the New TestamentIn the early days of Dead Sea Scrolls research all kinds of sensationalist statements were made about the connection of the Scrolls to the earliest Christians. We will explain how the Scrolls allow us to understand the variegated nature of the Judaism that served as the background for the rise of Christianity and the New Testament. We will see that the Scrolls clarify certain aspects of Christianity, despite the fact that they were all composed before the rise of the earliest Christian communities.

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  • Topic: The Dead Sea Scrolls: New Perspectives on the Bible, Judaism and Christianity Part 3 of 3: The Dead Sea Scrolls and the New Testament
    Speaker: LH Schiffman

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    In the early days of Dead Sea Scrolls research all kinds of sensationalist statements were made about the connection of the Scrolls to the earliest Christians. We will explain how the Scrolls allow us to understand the variegated nature of the Judaism that served as the background for the rise of Christianity and the New Testament. We will see that the Scrolls clarify certain aspects of Christianity, despite the fact that they were all composed before the rise of the earliest Christian communities.

    Lawrence H. Schiffman is the Judge Abraham Lieberman Professor of Hebrew and Judaic Studies at New York University and Director of the Global Network for Advanced Research in Jewish Studies. He served as the Chair of the Skirball Department of Hebrew and Judaic Studies at New York University and Ethel and Irvin A. Edelman Professor of Hebrew and Judaic Studies. Between 2011 and 2014, he served as Vice Provost for Undergraduate Education and Professor of Judaic Studies at Yeshiva University.

    He received his B.A., M.A., and Ph.D. degrees from the Department of Near Eastern and Judaic Studies at Brandeis University. He is a specialist in the Dead Sea Scrolls, Judaism in Late Antiquity, the history of Jewish law, and Talmudic literature.

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  • Topic: Ishay Ribo: Music to One’s Ear and Heart
    Speaker: Shalom Orzach

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  • Topic: Land Art/Earthworks
    Speaker: Tobi Kahn

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    Land Art/Earthworks is an art movement that emerged in the 1960s and 1970s, mainly in the United States and Great Britain. As a trend, “Land art” expanded boundaries of art by the materials used and the siting of the works. The materials mainly used were rocks, soil, vegetation and water found on-site. These works were often created in non-populated areas. Though sometimes fairly inaccessible, there was always photo documentation of the projects. This art movement coincided with the concerns around spiritual yearnings concerning planet Earth. Tobi Kahn will discuss 8 luminaries of the movement.

    Tobi Kahn, who will serve as CSP’s first ever one month artist in residence in May 2021 (fully funded by a grant from the Albert and Rhoda Weissman Arts Endowment Fund, a joint program of Jewish Community Foundation Orange County and Jewish Federation), is a painter and sculptor whose work has been shown in over 50 solo museum exhibitions and over 70 group museum and gallery exhibitions since he was selected as one of nine artists to be included in the 1985 Guggenheim Museum exhibition, New Horizons in American Art. Works by Kahn are in major museum, hospital, sacred/interfaith spaces, corporate, and private collections. For close to four decades, Kahn has been steadfast in the pursuit of his distinct vision and persistent in his commitment to the redemptive possibilities of art. In paint, stone, and bronze, he has explored the correspondence between the intimate and monumental. While his early works drew on the tradition of American Romantic landscape painting, his more recent pieces reflect his fascination with contemporary science, inspired by the micro-images of cell formations, the environment and satellite photography. For thirty years, Kahn has been making miniature sacred spaces he calls “shrines.” The first full-scale shrine, Shalev, is in New Harmony, Indiana, commissioned as an outdoor sculpture for Jane Owen and the Robert Lee Blaffer Trust. Among the awards that Kahn has received are the Outstanding Alumni Achievement Award from Pratt Institute in 2000; the Cultural Achievement Award for the Visual Arts from the National Foundation of Jewish Culture in 2004; and an Honorary Doctorate from the Jewish Theological Seminary in 2007 for his work as an artist and educator. Kahn also communicates his vision through his passion for teaching. For over three decades, he has taught fine arts workshops at the School of Visual Arts in New York City. He also designed the art curriculum for several high schools in the New York area and co-founded and facilitates the Artists’ Beit Midrash at the Streicker Center of Temple Emanu-El. Kahn lectures extensively at universities and public forums internationally on the importance of visual language and art as healing. Kahn received his BA in Photography and Printmaking from Hunter and an MFA in Painting and Sculpture from Pratt.

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  • Topic: Jewish Readings of Modern Movies and TV Part 3 of 4: Transparent: What Makes Ritual Meaningful?
    Speaker: Rafi Zarum

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    Transparent – What Makes Ritual and Faith Meaningful?The award-winning Transparent comedy-drama from Amazon Studios revolves around a Los Angeles Jewish family following the discovery that the father is transgender. In the final season they visit Israel, with hilarious and shocking results. This thoughtful show addresses challenging modern issues such as fluid sexuality, religious faith, meaningful ritual, family loyalty, and even Israel’s security barrier. In this session we will analyze a number of key clips from the show’s four seasons in order to reflect on our own Jewish journeys and how we can make our faith more meaningful.

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  • Topic: Prince of the Press: How One Collector Built History’s Most Enduring and Remarkable Jewish Library
    Speaker: Josh Teplitsky

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  • Topic: Israeli Art under Quarantine
    Speaker: Shirel Horovitz
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  • Topic: Virtual Bible Tour of the British Museum
    Speaker: Raphael Zarum

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    Watch as we move room to room and see highlights of artefacts relating to the Tanach. See Pharaoh, Achashverosh and Sennacherib appear before your eyes and in the text. Discover how a knowledge of ancient history can enhance and transform Bible study. Rabbi Dr. Zarum is Dean of the London School of Jewish Studies (LSJS). He has a doctorate in Theoretical Physics, a Masters’ in Education, and is a graduate of the Mandel Leadership School in Jerusalem. Raphael is a sought-after lecturer with wildly innovative and meaningful readings of Torah, Midrash, Talmud and the Jewish festivals that reference modern literature, cinema and culture.

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  • Topic: The Bible’s Strangest Book
    Speaker: Rabbi Ed Feinstein, live from the Valley, CA

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    CSP Partners: Congregation Beth Shalom (Seattle, WA), Congregation B’nai Tzedek (Fountain Valley, CA), Congregation B’nai Israel (Tustin, CA), Temple Bat Yahm (Newport Beach, CA). Temple Beth Ohr (La Mirada, CA), Temple Beth Tikvah (Fullerton, CA), Temple Beth Shalom (Needham, MA), Town & Village Synagogue (NYC, NY) & Valley Beth Shalom (Encino, CA)

    Tucked at the end of the Biblical prophets is the Bible’s strangest and most startling book, the Book of Jonah. Jonah is a meditation on human responsibility, the nature of justice, and the mission of the Jewish people in the world.  All in four short chapters. And starring a giant fish.
     
    Rabbi Ed Feinstein is senior rabbi of Valley Beth Shalom in Encino, California. He serves on the faculty of the Ziegler Rabbinical School of the American Jewish University, the Wexner Heritage Program, the Shalom Hartman Institute in Jerusalem and lectures widely across the United States.  He is the author of several books, including: Tough Questions Jews Ask – A Young Adult’s Guide to Building a Jewish Life, (Jewish Lights, 2003), was chosen for the American Library Association’s Top Ten Books on Religion for Young Readers and a finalist for the National Jewish Book Award.  Jews and Judaism in the Twenty-First Century: Human Responsibility, the Presence of God and the Future of the Covenant (Jewish Lights, 2007) was also a finalist for the National Jewish Book Award, Capturing the Moon (Behrman House, 2008) retells the best of classic and modern Jewish folktales. Most recently, Chutzpah Imperative! – Empowering Today’s Jews for a Life that Matters (Jewish Lights, 2014), offers a new way to “do Judaism,” Rabbi urges us to recover this message of Jewish self-empowerment, or chutzpah, to reshape the world. 
     
    Rabbi Feinstein was raised in the back of his parents’ bakery on the frontiers of the West San Fernando Valley. He graduated with honors from the University of California at Santa Cruz, the University of Judaism, Columbia University Teachers College, and the Jewish Theological Seminary of America, where he was ordained a rabbi in 1981. Most recently, he received his Doctorate in Education from the Jewish Theological Seminary (JTS) at Park Avenue Synagogue in New York for his dissertation: Rabbi Harold Schulweis and the Reinvention of the American Rabbinate.
     
    In 1982, Rabbi Feinstein became the founding director of the Solomon Schechter Academy of Dallas, Texas, building the school’s enrollment from 40 to over 500 in eight years, and winning national recognition as center of educational excellence. In 1990, he assumed the position of executive director of Camp Ramah in California, the largest Jewish camp and conference center in the western United States. He came to Valley Beth Shalom in 1993 at the invitation of the renowned Rabbi Harold Schulweis, and succeeded Rabbi Schulweis as the congregation’s senior rabbi in 2005. 
     
    Rabbi Feinstein is a member of the board of the Jewish Federation of Greater Los Angeles, a member of the school board of the Milken Community Schools and an active member of AIPAC. A survivor of two bouts of colon cancer, he speaks frequently to cancer support groups all over Southern California. Rabbi Feinstein lives in the epicenter of the San Fernando Valley with his wife Rabbi Nina Bieber Feinstein. Nina was the second woman ordained by the Conservative Movement. The Feinsteins are blessed with three grown children. 
     
    An engaging lecturer and storyteller, Rabbi Feinstein unites the ancient Jewish love of ideas with the warmth of Jewish humor.

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  • Topic: Using Works of Art to Grapple with the Story of German Jewry’s Encounter with the Modern World
    Speaker: Featuring Liz Diament, live from Silver Spring, MD

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    CSP Partners: Congregation Beth Shalom (Seattle, WA), Congregation B’nai Tzedek (Fountain Valley, CA), Congregation B’nai Israel (Tustin, CA), Temple Bat Yahm (Newport Beach, CA). Temple Beth Ohr (La Mirada, CA), Temple Beth Tikvah (Fullerton, CA), Temple Beth Shalom (Needham, MA), Town & Village Synagogue (NYC, NY) & Valley Beth Shalom (Encino, CA)

    This lecture will focus on works of art by the artist Moritz Daniel Oppenheim (1800-1882) who explores the German Jewish community’s dilemma in their struggle to maintain a Jewish identity while being challenged by assimilation and nationalism during the nineteenth century. As the first Jewish academically trained artist, and as an observant Jew, Oppenheim was in a unique position to observe and reflect on these challenges firsthand. Through an examination of Oppenheim’s genre scenes, portraits and religious stories we will uncover the complexity of Jewish life under Emancipation. Through careful observation, interpretation and discussion around works of art we will gain a fuller understanding of Jewish life in nineteenth century Germany.

    Liz Diament is a senior educator at the National Gallery of Art in Washington DC where she has managed and developed the docent education program for almost eighteen years. In addition, she manages the school tour and general public tour program. At the Gallery she is passionate about her work with teachers, helping them integrate art and critical thinking into the curriculum. A proud native of London, England, Liz graduated from Manchester University with an honors degree in Art History and a Masters’ Degree in Museum Education from Bank Street College of Education in New York. As a leader in the field of experiential museum education, Liz creates nationally acclaimed professional development workshops for teachers, both in person and on-line. She enjoys conducting interactive workshops exploring how Jewish texts, history and ideas can be interpreted and understood through the prism of works of art.

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